Russia's Daniil Medvedev captured the biggest title of his career Sunday, rallying to defeat Austria's Dominic Thiem in three sets at the Nitto ATP Finals in London.

Medvedev's 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-4) win in two hours and 43 minutes over the World No. 3 completed an unprecedented run at the season-ending event.

Medvedev, 24, also beat No. 1 Novak Djokovic and No. 2 Rafael Nadal earlier in the week, making him the first ever to sweep the top three players in the FedEx ATP Rankings at the ATP Finals.

The World No. 4 fired 12 aces and saved three of four break points, finishing with 37 winners and 30 unforced errors. Thiem, the reigning U.S. Open champion, saved eight of nine break points and finished with 29 winners and the same number of unforced errors.

"What a match. One of my best victories ... three sets against an amazing player," Medvedev said during the trophy ceremony. "Dominic, congratulations already for what you achieved in your career. Your name is already in the history of tennis books. It is amazing. You won a Grand Slam this year. You are playing unbelievable. I hope we are going to have many more matches to come on the big occasions like this."

Thiem scored the only service break in the opening set in the fifth game. There were no breaks in the second set and Thiem took a 2-0 lead in the tiebreak, only to see Medvedev reel off seven straight points.

In the third set, Medvedev won 14 of his 16 first-serve points and finally broke Thiem's serve in the fifth game.

"Of course, I am disappointed, but at the same time I am also proud of the performance of all the week. Daniil really deserved it," Thiem said during the trophy ceremony. "(It was an) amazing match. ... It was a pleasure today, even though I lost."

Thiem also finished runner-up in this event last year, losing in the final to Greece's Stefanos Tsitsipas in a third-set tiebreak.

Medvedev is the sixth different winner of the ATP Finals in the past six years. He is the first Russian champion since Nikola Davydenko in 2009, the first year the event was held in London. It moves to Turin, Italy, next year.

"I always said before this tournament that it would be an amazing story if, here in London, where the tournament was for 11 years, that the first champion would be Russian and the last champion would be Russian, too," Medvedev said. "A lot of thanks to Nikolay Davydenko for being an inspiration for many kids (like) me (by) winning here. I hope to continue doing his job."

--Field Level Media

Stay Informed

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Please log in, or sign up for a new, free account to read or post comments.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.